Hartford Local Questioned for Shooting


Pedro E. Segarra
Mayor

City of Hartford Police Department
50 Jennings Road
Hartford, Connecticut 06120
(860) 757-4000
police.hartford.gov


James C. Rovella
Chief of Police


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Protect our community and we will protect your identity:
On-line Tip Form or call Hartford CRIME STOPPERS ad 860-722-TIPS (8477)

PUBLIC SAFETY NEWS
From the City of Hartford Office of Communications and New Media

For Immediate Release:    Monday, August 13, 2012

HARTFORD SHOOTING TASK FORCE MAKES ARREST IN INVESTIGATION OF SERIOUS ASSAULT WITH A FIREARM ON SEPTEMBER 11, 2011

(Hartford) – Police Chief James C. Rovella today announced the Hartford Shooting Task Force has made an arrest following an investigation into a serious assault with a firearm that occurred in the vicinity of Hillside Avenue and Ward Place on September 11, 2011, which left a victim shot seven times.  The victim, though seriously injured, recovered from his injuries.

Joseph Soto, 21, of 110 Laurel Street, Hartford, has been charged by Hartford Police with first degree assault and carrying a pistol without a permit.  Soto remains in custody on a $750,000 bond.

In commenting on the arrest, Police Chief Rovella said, “I commend Task Force members Inspector Edwin Rodriguez, Hartford Police Detective David Ragion, and Hartford Police Officer Tanya Ortiz, for their relentless pursuit of information about this incident that has lead to the arrest of this violent individual.  Soto’s violent actions on September 11, 2011, spurred a number of retaliatory shooting incidents which the Hartford Shooting Task Force continues to investigate in order to bring those responsible to justice and held accountable for the violence they perpetrate in our city.”

Anyone with information on this incident or other shooting incidents can contact Sergeant Sean Spell, Supervisor of the Hartford Shooting Task Force, at 860-757-4112, the Hartford Police Department’s Major Crimes Division Commander Lieutenant Brian Foley at 860-757-4463, or Sergeant Brandon O’Brien at 860-757-4089.

Anonymous, confidential tips for cash rewards may be made on-line or by phone at Hartford Crime stoppers 860-722-TIPS (8477).


Joseph Soto, DOB 9/22/1990, 110 Laurel Street, Hartford

On July 5, 2011, Mayor Segarra, joined by Chief State’s Attorney Kane, State’s Attorney Hardy, then Chief Inspector James C. Rovella, and others, launched the Shooting Task Force, a collaboration of local, state and federal law enforcement agencies dedicated to eradicating gun violence in Connecticut’s Capital City.  A partnership between the Hartford Police Department, Office of the Hartford State’s Attorney, Office of the Chief State’s Attorney, the Connecticut State Police, the Connecticut Departments of Correction and Parole, and the West Hartford, Manchester, Wethersfield and East Hartford police departments, the Hartford Shooting Task Force is charged with investigating gun violence and bringing those responsible for such violence to prosecution.  It also collaborates with the Violent Crimes Bureau and the Witness Protection Unit in the Office of the Chief State’s Attorney and in conjunction with the Central Connecticut Cold Case Task Force.  During the first year of its operation, from July 5, 2012 through June 30, 2012, the City of Hartford has seen a 31.48% reduction in shooting victims.  Visit police.hartford.gov for more information about the Hartford Shooting Task Force.

Contact:   Nancy M Mulroy, Executive Assistant for Communications,  860-757-4021 or 860-550-1025
City of Hartford Office of Communications and New Media
Maribel LaLuz, Director, 860-757-9731
Visit police.hartford.gov  for more Public Safety News

Local Hartford Prostitution Ring Discovered in Frog Hollow (Hartford, CT)


Pedro E. Segarra
Mayor

City of Hartford Police Department
50 Jennings Road
Hartford, Connecticut 06120
(860) 757-4000
police.hartford.gov


James C. Rovella
Chief of Police


Follow us on:    Bookmark and Share

Protect our community and we will protect your identity:
On-line Tip Form or call Hartford CRIME STOPPERS ad 860-722-TIPS (8477)

PUBLIC SAFETY NEWS
From the City of Hartford Office of Communications and New Media

For Immediate Release:     Thursday, August 23, 2012

HARTFORD POLICE REVERSE PROSTITUTION STING
RESULTS IN SEVEN ARRESTS

(Hartford, CT.) – Police Chief James C. Rovella confirmed today that a reverse prostitution sting operation conducted by the Hartford Police Vice and Narcotics Division on August 21, 2012, resulted in seven arrests.

“The reverse prostitution detail was conducted in response to numerous citizen complaints of street level prostitution occurring in the area of Wethersfield Avenue and Morris Street,” said Chief Rovella.

The following individuals were arrested by Hartford on August 21, 2012, during the reverse prostitution sting:

  • Patrick Codling, 45, of 32 Oakland Terrace, Hartford, charged with patronizing a prostitute.

  • Robert Velazquez, 43, of 187 Babcock Street, Hartford, charged with patronizing a prostitute.

  • Marcal Cruz, 54, of 131 Exeter Street, Hartford, charged with patronizing a prostitute and motor vehicle violations.

  • Franco Tieco, 26, of 131 Exeter Street, Hartford, charged with patronizing a prostitute.

  • Kenneth Dejesus, 42, of 324 West Lane, Kensington, CT, charged with patronizing a prostitute.

  • Kevin Hairston, 19, of Oak Street, New Britain, CT, charged with patronizing a prostitute.

  • Richard Cruz, 23, of 16 Maryland Way, Windsor Locks, charged with promoting prostitution and interfering with police.

Contact:   Nancy M Mulroy, Executive Assistant for Communications,  860-757-4021 or 860-550-1025/cell or text
City of Hartford Office of Communications and New Media
Maribel LaLuz, Director, 860-757-9731
Visit police.hartford.gov  for more Public Safety News

Person Shot In Hartford

By SAMAIA HERNANDEZ, smhernandez@courant.com

The Hartford Courant

11:13 a.m. EDT, September 7, 2012

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HARTFORD ——

The condition of a man shot at a Blue Hills Avenue gas station Thursday night has been upgraded to stable and there has been an arrest in the case, police said Friday.

The names of the victim and the arrested person were not released.

The male victim, who was not identified, was driven in a private car to St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, police said.

The shooting happened at the Petro Pantry at Blue Hills Avenue and Boothbay Street, nor far from the Bloomfield border.

Police were called at 7:18 p.m., but witnesses said they heard 5 shots or so at around 7 p.m.

http://www.courant.com/community/hartford/hc-hartford-shooting-0907-20120906,0,7227348.story

Hartford Ranks 24th on National Crime List

Hartford Courant

HARTFORD — The city has cracked the top 25 in a listing of cities with the worst crime rates in the country.

“City Crime Rates 2009-2010: Crime in Metropolitan America,” ranked Hartford 24th, three spots behind Philadelphia and six places ahead of Newark, N.J., in a listing of 393 cities with populations of 75,000 and above.

The publication, which used 2008 FBI crime statistics for murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary and motor vehicle theft to compile its current rankings, listed Camden, N.J.; St. Louis, Mo.; Oakland, Calif.; Detroit; and Flint, Mich. as the top five most dangerous cities. Bridgeport ranked 44th and Springfield ranked 51st.

The publication ranked Colonie, N.Y.; Amherst, N.Y.; Mission Viejo, Calif.; Irvine, Calif.; and Ramapo, N.Y., as the top five safest cities. Danbury was the highest-ranking Connecticut city for safety at 29.

Hartford ranked 27th on the list last year.

Statistics for New Haven were not reported to the FBI, according to Ben Krasney, a spokesman for CQ Press, the publisher of the list.

Law enforcement officials have been critical of the listing, calling it an irresponsible use of crime statistics that provides no insight into contributing factors such as population density, economic conditions and local police strength or crime-reporting practices by citizens. But Krasney said the listing, now in its 16th year, provides a public service and is taken seriously by local police chiefs and elected officials.

“It’s one way to look at data, Krasney said. “It provides a quick snapshot of how you compare to other cities.”

Nancy Mulroy, spokeswoman for the Hartford Police Department, disagreed, saying the department is familiar with the listing but does not use it for crime analysis.

“In the last five years we’ve had consistent declines in part one crime and 2008 was the lowest reported crime in the city’s recorded history,” Mulroy said. Part one crimes include murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny and motor vehicle theft.

Mulroy also questioned how cities with many different contributing factors can be lumped together in one report.

“I don’t know how Hartford at 18.5 miles can be compared with Little Rock or Philadelphia,” she said.

By The Numbers

The top five safest and most dangerous municipalities in the U.S., using 2008 FBI crime statistics:

Most Dangerous:

* Camden, N.J.

* St. Louis, Mo.

* Oakland, Calif.

* Detroit

* Flint, Mich.

Safest:

* Colonie, N.Y.

* Amherst, N.Y.

* Mission Viejo, Calif.

* Irvine, Calif.

* Ramapo, N.Y.

Stories of Crime in Hartford, CT

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“I lived in Hartford for many years, once in an apartment near Hartford Hospital, also an apartment just off of Park Street. My advice to anyone wanting to travel here is to stay away. 37 years ago when I used to work in downtown Hartford I was robbed while waiting to take the bus home from just in front of the Old State House which is downtown Hartford. I was followed home by a robber when I went to the drug store on Farmington Ave. but I managed to get away, get into the condo building before he could rob me. I lived off of Farmington Avenue in a building called The Willoughby. Back then it was apartments, but now it is condominiums. The area was bad back then but is much worse now, drug dealers breaking into the condominium building, hookers doing tricks on the steps inside the building. It’s such a shame. I don’t understand why the police are not out in full force cleaning up these areas. I’m sure years ago Hartford was a very nice place to live. Years ago I would drive to the North end with my husband to go to a Jamaican bakery but no longer. That area was dangerous back then, but with all the crack heads now, much much worse. My advice to you, if you do decide to visit any part of Hartford, take pepper spray with you. The Mark Twain house is worth a visit, also the Wadsworth Atheneum art gallery. But if you are a woman, do not carry a pocketbook, keep your money hidden.”–Woman, Resident of Hartford for 37 years, Age 58, May 15, 2012

“Don’t walk anywhere alone after dark in Hartford. Everyone who lives in Hartford has been or knows somebody who has been robbed, stabbed, raped or killed in the city.
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I stopped at a gas station on Albany Ave near downtown one night to use an ATM. I was robbed immediatley upon leaving the gas station by a woman who appeared to be a crackhead.

I was able to flag down a cop who drove by the gas station mere seconds after the incident occured, however the officer made no attempt to find the woman or recover my stolen purse. Instead he asked me: “What is a white girl like you doing here? You better get out of here before this robbery becomes a homicide”. The Hartford police just seem so jaded, robberies are nothing to them apparently.

Also my boyfriend was jumped on Capital Ave by two guys in a car. They stole the earrings out of his ears and broke his nose and mouth open.”–Man, Resident of Hartford for 17 years, Age 25, December 9, 2006.
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“Hartford is known for many things. Unfortunately, one of these things is Crime. Hartford has been ranked as one of the most dangerous cities in the Country, peaking at #7 in 2004. Most of this violence is contained in the Frog Hollow, Upper Clay Hill/Arsenal, Northeast, and the Upper Albany areas.
Generally, most attractions are outside of these areas anyways, but a few myths should be cleared up about some of these areas.
Park street, the main street in Frog Hollow has copious shops and resturaunts. Park street is vibrant and does not need to be avoided, as it is literally one of the most vibrant areas of the city. The side streets should be avoided, however.
Albany Avenue, which runs through Clay Hill/Arsenal, Upper Albany, and a bit of Blue Hills is another tough one. Several crimes are committed in this area, but generally not on the actual Avenue. There are alot of shops/resturaunts here too, as well as a larger police presence because a large station is located somewhere around the midsection of the avenue. Generally, I would avoid the part nearest to downtown, which is the least vibrant, and most dangerous (located in the highest crime/poverty zone). This is unfortunate because the rest of Albany Avenue has merit, and acts as Hartford’s 125th street, but it can only be accessed by car, as all the hotels are seperated from the midsection by the slums.
That being said, the Northeast and Clay Hill/Arsenal sections do not have any merit and are especially dangerous. Some census blocks have been ranked as more dangerous than the most dangerous areas of the South Bronx. But again, you’d have to go out of your way to go here – there is nothing to see.
Also, be careful around the webster. This serves as the non-huge name concert venue for Greater Hartford, but is unfortunately also in an area of crime. People have been mugged, beat up, or had their cars stolen. But, all one has to do is stay on the main rd within a few blocks of the venue, and preferably pay to park the cars.”–Man, Retired Sergeant Hartford Police Department, February 3, 2007
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“Hartford really doesn’t have a single non intimidating area minus the area when you get into West Hartford. Hartford’s north end is scary even during noon. At night there are crack heads everywhere, drug dealing, prostitution, and gang activity. There is a shooting or stabbing that happens in this area every night. If you drive through there at night it is very possible people will try to sell you drugs, people in the streets will shout something at you, and crack heads will come up to your car. So lock your doors, DON’T LEAVE YOUR CAR, and better yet just avoid this neighborhood overall.

The Park St. area (known as Frog Hollow section of town) is also another ghetto. The Frog Hollow Section has a problem with homeless, gang violence, and drug dealing. Again, do the same as you would do when your traveling the north end.

While these are the two bad sections, they make up around 75% of the city. The only nice part of Hartford is the West End which is filled with beautiful mansions and some nice restaurants. But even the West End has its bad areas (the areas where the West End goes into the Frog Hollow area). And as for downtown, it is extremely shady at night. Nights when I would walk from the downtown bars to my car, me and my friends would always run into shady characters asking for money or threatening us.”–Woman, Age 48, March 26, 2006.

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